• Is it a stretch to think that if these were low-income students, this would be considered as something pathological and detrimental to their success rather than “rowdy”?

    Hundreds of students participate in a college with an enrollment of less than 1800.

    “But complaints about rowdy behavior were especially prevalent during Trick or Drink, when hundreds of students would walk in large groups throughout the neighborhood.
    During the event, seniors living off-campus decorate their houses based on certain themes. They sell tickets to underclassmen, who socialize with older students and sample a different drink at each stop.”

    tags: socialclass

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “In Coronado, Calif., a wealthy enclave off the coast of San Diego, for example, local education groups, which support about 3,200 students in five schools, raised more than $1,500 per student in 2010. These private funds helped pay for arts and music classes at all grade levels, sports medicine courses at the high school and a digital media academy at the middle school, where students are learning animation and designing buildings with 3-D printers.

    By contrast, the combined fund-raising of groups affiliated with schools in the San Diego Unified School District — where the median household income is about two-thirds that of Coronado — amounted to $19.57 per student.”

    tags: socialclass

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “In effect, the United States has become 19th-century Britain: We provide superb education for elites, but we falter at mass education.

    In particular, we fail at early education. Across the O.E.C.D., an average of 70 percent of 3-year-olds are enrolled in education programs. In the United States, it’s 38 percent.

    In some quarters, there’s a perception that American teachers are lazy. But the O.E.C.D. report indicates that American teachers work far longer hours than their counterparts abroad. Yet American teachers earn 68 percent as much as the average American college-educated worker, while the O.E.C.D. average is 88 percent.”

    tags: socialclass

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “Even the most liberal parents are unlikely to be comfortable with the idea that their own children should fall down the scale in the name of making room for a smarter kid from a poorer home”

    tags: socialclass

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • Gaps between rich and poor can’t be explained only by deficits in language in low-income families or the low-expectations of teachers in low-income schools. Wealthy families will never simply stand still while other people’s children catch up to theirs.

    “What’s going on? Well, it’s all about glass floors and glass ceilings. Rich kids who can go work for the family business — and, in Canada at least, 70 percent of the sons of the top 1 percent do just that — or inherit the family estate don’t need a high school diploma to get ahead. It’s an extreme example of what economists call “opportunity hoarding.” That includes everything from legacy college admissions to unpaid internships that let affluent parents rig the game a little more in their children’s favor.”

    tags: socialclass

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “Imagine a system of college education supported by high and growing government spending on elite private universities that mainly educate children of the wealthy and upper-middle class, and low and declining government spending on public universities that educate large numbers of children from the working class and the poor.

    You can stop imagining. That’s the American system right now.

    Government subsidies to elite private universities take the form of tax deductions for people who make charitable contributions to them. In economic terms a tax deduction is the same as government spending. It has to be made up by other taxpayers.

    These tax subsidies are on the rise because in recent years a relatively few very rich people have had far more money than they can possibly spend or even give away to their children. So they’re donating it to causes they believe in, such as the elite private universities that educated them or that they want their children to attend”

    tags: socialclass

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 52 other followers